Monthly Archives: January 2018

How much is client service worth?

3 examples of companies that will show how you should never underestimate the value of client service in IT.

Client service is a big and important part of your IT organization’s support. In fact, it may be worth a lot more than you think.

In your IT manager role it is important to understand the value of client service and what it can do for your IT organization.

To illustrate how important client service is to a company, I’ll use three personal examples. These three company examples will give you a sample of just how important it is with companies that understand the value of client service.

Example 1: IBM

I worked for IBM way back in the “mini-computer” days when small and medium companies were buying their first computer. It was an exciting time that included lots of fun as well as hard work.

What I initially thought was that IBM’s revenue came mainly from new client sales. I was wrong and quickly learned that about 70 percent of the revenue at that time came from existing customers. This is true in many companies today if you look closely at their revenue makeup.

What this means is that existing clients are very important to a company’s success. So, retaining clients and maximizing the sales potential from existing clients is going to be a strong focus.

IBM placed a huge emphasis on client retention. The way they did this was to build incentives into their sales plan for marketing reps. If a company left IBM and went to a competitor, the marketing rep accountable for the client paid IBM back the current commission value of the lost business.

That’s right, you paid IBM back even if you did not sell the business many years earlier.

The message was simple: IBM marketing reps need to be on top of the client satisfaction of their assigned clients. Future business is dependent upon it so IBM places a high value on their existing clients.

I can assure you that the risk of losing real dollars creates real incentive.

Example 2: Infiniti

I have owned five Infiniti automobiles and still drive one today. A major reason is due to a client service experience I had with my first Infiniti car in 1990.

What happened is that I got in my car one Monday morning to go to work and the car wouldn’t start. The reason I learned later was because I had accidentally left the car door ajar over the weekend and the battery was dead.

I went to work in my wife’s car and asked her to call the Infiniti dealership to see about getting the car checked out. At this point we were not sure what the problem was although we suspected it was simply a dead battery.

To make a long story short, Infiniti received the “support call” and took care of the situation.

While they were doing all of this, they called my wife six times to keep her updated on their progress and the status of the car. Here is how it went:

  • Infiniti receives the support call.
  • Infiniti calls owner, “A technician is on his way and will be there in approximately 30 minutes.”
  • Infiniti technician arrives, charges the battery and transports the car to the dealership to inspect it more fully to insure there were no additional issues.
  • Infiniti calls owner, “Your automobile has arrived; we are checking it out and will call back once we know what the issue is.”
  • Infiniti calls owner, “We have inspected your automobile; the problem was a dead battery. We are charging it fully and will call you once the repair is completed.”
  • Infiniti calls owner, “Your automobile is repaired and should be returned in approximately 30 minutes.”
  • Automobile is returned.
  • Infiniti calls owner, “Calling to confirm you have received your automobile in good working order.”
  • Infiniti calls owner, “How did we do in taking care of your problem?”

By this time, my wife is saying, “Enough already!”, but she was also very happy.

Here is the key point and something IT managers should think about when supporting their clients. Infiniti communicated often to keep their customer aware and in the loop. My wife never had to guess about the status of the situation and this creates a “peace of mind” that is valuable.

It set the tone for me purchasing more automobiles from this dealership.

Example 3: 4imprint

Recently I ordered 50 personalized journals for a class reunion we were having from 4imprint, a company I had ordered similar journals from before.

The journals arrived in three boxes. We opened the smaller of the three boxes to inspect the journals and were very happy with them. All is good, or so we thought.

Fast forward a month later and it is Thursday around noon only two days before the big reunion. At the last minute I decide to put an ink pen in the journal loops. I assigned this important task to my wife and she starts adding a pen to each journal.

Then I hear those terrible words, “Mike, we have a problem!”

The ten journals in the small box we had inspected were perfect, just what we ordered. But the two large boxes had some other company’s journals which were completely different from ours.

It was our fault for not checking all of the boxes when we received them, but we still have a problem. I’m thinking we will probably not be able to give our classmates a journal at the reunion. Instead, I’m preparing to hold one up and tell them, “This is what your journal will look like.”

I call 4imprint and get routed to one of their client service reps. I explain the problem, she asks me a few questions, and then she tells me she is going to contact their production facility to determine what options we have. She also says she will call me back as soon as she talks to the production people.

The end result was that we received the replacement journals within 24 hours of my call, unbelievable client service. The other thing that impressed me was how well the client service rep communicated the status of our situation; I was never left in the dark.

I was so impressed that I sent the president of the company a nice note and told him how happy I was with their products and client service. I will order more from this company in the future.

What does this all mean?

Great client service creates advocates for your company, , , or for your IT organization. These advocates buy more products and services from you or they become partners and support agents for you and your team.

Plus, and this may be the biggest benefit, they tell others about their positive experience.

Great client service adds tremendous value to your company or to your IT organization. The bottom line is that client service is important and providing excellent client service reaps big benefits.

And what do you think is the key component to delivering great client service?

You bet, , , it is communicating well. That’s the trick.

So, you want to take full advantage of creating great client service by communicating and following-up well. It pays real dividends.

Get More Done With a Simple TO DO List

A simple To Do List can filter the noise and distraction you encounter so you can focus on important priorities and get more done.

IT managers deal with considerable pressure from new and changing priorities that occur in today’s dynamic work environment. These distractions will negatively impact your team’s performance unless you do something to help you and your team stay focused on the important issues.

Our work environments get crazier and more hectic all the time. Guess what: it probably isn’t going to change anytime soon.

Technology innovation has been super in giving us tools to do so much more in our working lives and to access these systems from virtually anywhere and at any time.

The downside with all this “greatness” comes the fact that in today’s world it is hard to get away from the work, especially in IT. User needs and their dependencies upon technology have expanded and will continue to do so. This brings with it an ever increasing list of To Do’s that present major challenges for IT managers every day.

We need something to help us focus on what’s important and to eliminate as much of the “noise” as possible.

What I use is a simple Weekly To Do List. I’ve been using “my system” for 30 years since my early IBM days. It’s a very simple system that helps keep you focused in order to get more accomplished plus help ensure you focus on the right things, , , or you can call them the most important things.

Here is how it works 

I actually start with a Monthly Objectives or TO DO List that gives me an overall set of things I want to accomplish in a month. Recently, I’ve simply been putting it in a work journal shown below.

Every weekend I create a list of the key things I need to accomplish the following week, , , pulled from my Monthly Objectives List or things that help me complete them. These Weekly tasks are quite often more detailed and might include several “reminder tasks” to get accomplished in the week.

When I have my week sorted out, I rank the Weekly To Do’s in order of highest priority to lowest priority, , , or sometimes just in “A, B or C” priority.

If something comes up with a high priority during the week it gets added to the list in the appropriate position I think is warranted.

During the week, I force myself to focus on the top priority things on this Weekly To Do List. Quite often, the fun thing to work on is not really the top priority so my To Do List is always there to help me stay on track.

If something does not get completed during the week it goes on next week’s list if it is still important.

On a weekly basis, I also refer to the Monthly Objectives List to gauge how well I’m getting through the major objectives for the month.

Using this process does three important things for me:

  1. Provides focus and keeps me on track during the week. I’m convinced this helps me get more done every week.
  2. Reduces procrastination because I have clarity on what to do.
  3. Gives me a sense of accomplishment as I check things off the list.

What you will find is that this process is simple, does not require a lot of time, and it reduces a lot of the “noise” and helps you focus, , , and when you focus you get more accomplished. You will also discover that when you have clarity of what to focus on it reduces stress.

Let’s face it, juggling all the issues and needs that find their way onto your desk can be overwhelming at times. I’ve even seen managers “lock up” because they can’t determine what to work on when they have a heavy list of To Do’s. A system like this helps you cut through the chaos and focus.

My system started with pen and paper when I started my career with IBM, and I migrated to Excel spreadsheets later. Now, I use a journal for the most part.

When there is some “heavy lifting” requirements, I use a workflow system for IT managers called Priority Matrix that automates many of the things I had to do manually.

I created a To Do List template for the Priority Matrix System that you will be able to see on their web site.

Use a system that helps you focus on the important priorities that need your attention and you will achieve more success. The tool is not so important as the process of listing out your To Do’s and making yourself focus on what’s important.

Good luck and success in organizing yourself.

2018 IT Manager Training Schedule

I’m excited about the training we have lined up for 2018. Take a look at the schedule to the right and click on the image to learn more about this year’s training.

GOLD MEMBERS receive new training every month plus access to over 100 recorded classes and our entire IT Manager Resources Library. Check it out at: